New WA Protocol for Energy Efficiency for Alterations and Additions

A new WA Alterations and Additions Protocol for energy efficiency in Class 1 or attached Class 10 buildings (simply put, residential homes, garages, carports, pools, fences!) will apply from 1st May 2015.

New Energy Assessment methods currently in WA are still allowed to meet energy efficiency requirements by using the 2009 BCA Deemed to Satisfy (DTS) provisions for all residential buildings being renovated, altered, extended, improved or repaired.

The new IB042/2014 WA Alterations and Additions Protocol allow two new assessment methods to achieve compliance…..

Stop there!

OK, so in plain English.

The changes that come into effect in May have been a year in transition, and what it basically means is that all new alterations and additions need to be assessed differently than before in regards to the energy ratings.

Previously, an addition could be assessed in isolation to see how it complies but the changes mean the whole house has to be assessed to ensure it complies in its newly renovated format.

So, the impact is that the plans for all residential buildings that are being renovated, altered, extended, improved or repaired will now have to be completed as whole-of-house assessments, regardless of the size of the alteration or addition.

For example: a new 6m2 en-suite will typically require a whole-of-house assessment. As a result, clients now require final working plans for building approval to show not only the new addition specification but also the existing building detail and specifications.

As the checklist below highlights, there’s a lot to consider prior to submitting for assessment. Where information is not known, a worst case scenario will have to be assumed to complete the assessment.

Alterations & Additions Minimum Plan Requirement Checklist

  • Site plan to detail orientation
  • Scaling for all new and existing external walls
  • Floor plan showing combined new and existing build detail
  • Window dimensions for all new and existing windows
  • Operability of all new and existing windows
  • Window glass and frame type of all existing windows
  • Year existing house was constructed
  • Specification of new alterations/additions AND existing house
  • External wall construction
  • External wall insulation type and R-Value (or thickness) - if applicable
  • External wall colour (light, medium or dark if exact colour not known)
  • External floor type - on ground or suspended
  • External floor insulation type and R-Value (or thickness) – if applicable
  • Flooring type – carpet, tiles, timber or concrete for each room/zone
  • Internal wall type – masonry or stud frame
  • External ceiling – heights
  • External ceiling – raked or flat
  • External ceiling insulation type and R-Value (or thickness) - if applicable
  • Roof type – metal or tiled
  • Roof colour (light, medium or dark if exact colour not known)
  • Roof insulation type and R-Value – if applicable
  • Roof ventilation – vented or non-vented
  • Electrical – number of recessed down lights for each room/zone
  • Electrical – exhaust fans or vents

While this sounds worst than it is, at Barefoot, it’s just one of the many areas that we ensure gets the necessary attention in the planning and design stage to expedite the approvals process along the way to a Building Permit.

We pride ourselves on attention to detail and work alongside our clients, designers and external consultants (ie. Energy Assessors!) to ensure a smooth and efficient process and outcomes that meet expectations and budgets.

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